Standby Power & UPS

Kaas Electric can provide both short term, and long term uninterrupted power solutions

If you have lived in Iowa for any period of time, you have probably experienced one or more power outages. 

Backup power systems are used to keep electrical systems running during a power utility interruption. From individual equipment devices to full building and property backup power systems, Kaas Electric will be able to evaluate your specific power needs and deliver the appropriate solution.

Two of the most popular types of backup power supply systems are Generators and UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply).

Generators

A generator is a machine that converts mechanical energy into electricity. They generally require fuel, such as natural gas, LP gas or diesel fuel, to operate. They are installed outside the home and are wired through an automatic transfer switch to the main electrical panel. During a power outage, generators automatically kick in and restore power to a building in about 20 seconds and continue to run until power is restored. Kaas Electric can install a system large enough to power your whole house (including your air conditioning) or a smaller model to just power necessities such as a refrigerator, lights and emergency band radios. These large backup power systems can provide a feeling of safety, security and well-being during stressful acts of nature. Properly installed whole house generators are also much safer than the solutions provided by gasoline powered generators and extensions cords.

UPS

An uninterruptible power supply, also uninterruptible power source, stores power in batteries. Any equipment plugged into an UPS runs from the power provided by the batteries. Therefore, an interruption to a building’s electricity will not cause a power outage to the equipment plugged into an UPS for the duration of the power that the batteries supply.

The on-battery runtime of an UPS system is limited to the amount of battery storage. Therefore, they are generally used to protect computers, data centers, telecommunication equipment or other electrical equipment from unexpected power outages rather than providing continued power to larger electronic equipment.